University of Utah
Psychology 325: Child Abnormal Psychology (Developmental Psychopathology)
Beginning Autumn, 1996
Instructor: Darcy Uno

Anticipated enrollment: 50 students

This class provides an introduction to the etiology, development, and diagnosis of child and adolescent psychopathology. Lectures, discussions, readings, and assignments focus on various theoretical perspectives on child and adolescent psychopathology. Individual, interpersonal, contextual, and cultural factors contributing to the development of psychopathology are addressed. Several specific child and adolescent psychological disorders will be highlighted and discussed.

Students in this course will have the option of participating in a "service learning track." Service learning students will be placed at one of two facilities for treating emotionally disturbed children. Students will spend at least three hours each week participating in the milieu treatment of these children, working under the supervision of a volunteer coordinator. Bimonthly discussion groups will help students process and learn from their experiences. Required papers will focus on integrating practical (service learning) experiences and assigned readings.

Description of Service Learning Component

(1) Students will provide a needed service. The service component of this course is designed to assist not-for-profit therapeutic schools (CBTU and The Children's Center) and their program in the treatment of emotionally and behaviorally disturbed children. These programs depend on volunteers to help them provide positive experiences for troubled children. Service learning students will be engaged in the milieu treatment of children, providing them with attention, care, support, understanding, and supervision.

(2) Service experience is Content relevant . The activities of the service learning students will be directly relevant to the topic of the course (abnormal child psychology). Service learning experiences will provide students with the opportunity to observe son-e of the emotional and behavioral problems discussed in class. The opportunity to work closely with "troubled" children will help to "humanize" the topic of child psychopathology.

(3) Class -provides students with structured opportunities for learning through service. Students will be required to attend bimonthly discussion groups to process their experiences as volunteers. They will also be required to write a paper integrating their practical experiences with the knowledge/ understanding acquired through readings, lectures, and class discussions.

(4) Learning derived from service will be assessed. Students will be asked to write a paper focusing on how their experience has contributed to their personal and intellectual development. Specifically, they will be asked to integrate their "bookil knowledge and "practical" knowledge. This paper will be graded and will count toward their final grade. Also, volunteer coordinators will be asked to evaluate each students functioning as a volunteer.

(5) The volunteer supervisors will provide feedback reciardincr student's functioning and contribution to the program, Each of the agencies in which service learning students will be placed have volunteer coordinators who will be supervising student activities and who will provide feedback to the course instructor throughout the quarter. Note: 'Ihe level of participation of the service learning students will be determined by the agencies.

(6) Service is oriented to facilitate the development of good citizens as well as good students, The service learning experience will make students aware of the benefits provided by not-for-profit community agencies. Hopefully, the experience gained thro-ugh this opportunity will encourage students to be civicly involved in the larger community.

(7) Knowledge from coursework will enhance service. The issues covered in the classroom will help students understand the various factors influencing the psychological functioning of the children at these agencies. Such an understanding will help the student to become a more sensitive and effective service provider.

(8) Classmtes will learn from one another. As part of the bimonthly discussion groups, students will be encouraged to share their experiences with their peers and to discuss the relevance of these experiences to the issues discussed in the more formal learning aspects of the class.

This class provides an introduction to the etiology, development, and diagnosis of child and adolescent psychopathology. Lectures, discussions, readings, and assignments focus on various theoretical perspectives on child and adolescent psychopathology. Individual, interpersonal, contextual, and cultural factors contributing to the development of psychopathology will be addressed. Several specific child and adolescent psychological disorders will be highlighted and discussed.

Prerequisits Psychology 101, 250, and 265; OR permission of instructor

Withdrawls- Withdrawal slips will be signed by the instructor "no questions asked" until the day before the first exam. No withdrawals will be allowed after an exam has been taken unless there is a medical reason why you neez to withdraw from the class.

Text:

Wenar, C. (1994) Develpmental Psychopathology: From Infancy Throuigh Adolescence. Third Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill

Overheads: Overheads from the lectures can be xeroxed from Marriott Library. One week's worth of overheads will be placed on reserve the week prior to class meetings.

Course requirements: Students are required to complete all assigned readings, take the exams, and either participate in a weekly service leaming field placement or write a 10 page paper on a topic relevant to child psychopathology. You are responsible for all material presented in class and in the book. Reading should be done before the class for which it is assigned. Not all lecture material is covered in the book and not afl reading material wifl be discussed in class. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you come to class. Students who anend regularly generally obtain higher test scores. Therefore, if you miss a lecture, please make arrangements with a classmate to take notes or to tape the lecture.

Grades Option A

 Volunteer Experience (27 hours)           25%
 Observation Journal                        25%
  Bimonthly Discussion Groups                25%
  Final Exam                                 25%

Grades Option B

           Exam I                                          25%
               Exam 11                                    25%
               Exam III                                   25%
               Literature Review Paper                    25%

Exams: Three in-class exams will be given during the quarter for option B students. In these exams, you will be tested only on the lecture material and readings covered since the beginning of the class (Exarn I) or since the last exarn (Exams 2 & 3). Each exam will be worth approximately 100 points and wiU include a combination of short answer and essay questions. An optional comprehensive exam will be given. This will cover all material discussed throughout the entire quarter. If you take the optional final, this exam score can replace the lowest score of the three in-class exarns. Other than this comprehensive final, NO MAKEUP EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN. If you niiss an exam, you should plan to take the comprehensive final. If you are aware of an absence on a scheduled test day, you can make arrangements to take the exam EARLY. Option A students are required to take the fmal exam.

Qption A-Service-Leaming Field Placement: Studentsmayparticipateinafieldexperienceateitherthe Children's Center ( a day treatment program for emotionally disturbed preschoolers) or the Children's Behavior Therapy Unit (CBTU: a preschool for children with autism). Both sites are within walldng distance of the University. Each require a 3-hour per week commitment for a minimum of nine weeks. Grades will be based on attendance, acfive parficipation at the field site and discussion groups, and observation joumals.

Contact Persons

         Martha Taylor at the Children's Center (582-5534)
         Robin Gocknour at Child Behavior Treatrnent Unit (581-0194)

Qption B - Literature Review: A second option to fulfill course requirements is to write a 10-page paper on a topic from the list below. Students who wish to write on another topic must obtain approval from the instructor by 10/16. Papers on unapproved topics will not be accepted. Papers are due on 11/18. They will be graded on the following content and style criteria:

  1. The paper must review the literature, citing current work and using primary sources (e.g., current joumals), rather than general textbooks.
  2. The content must be accurate.
  3. Tlere should be some critical analysis and interpretation of the literature. If multiple theories or findings exist, they should be integrated and interpreted. Results of studies should not be uncritically accepted, but evaluated in terms of the study methodology.
  4. The paper must be well-organized and easy to follow.
  5. The writing style should be clear, concise, and grammatical, without illogical or run-on sentences.
  6. Sources must be cited correctly.
  7. The paper must be in APA style.

Potential Topics

The effect of temperament or parent-child attachment in the development of psychopathology.

Current research on the existence of personality disorders in childhood.

Psychosexual disorders in children: gender identity disorder, fetishism, etc.

Suicidal behavior in children and adolescents.

Mental Health Consequences of chronic or life-threatening illness in children.

Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 10:35:20MST
From: Renee Buchanan<RBUCHAN@ssb1.saff.utah.edu