Date: Wed, 27 Dec 1995 16:26:43 MST
                                        From: Renee Buchanan <RBUCHAN@ssb1.saff.utah.edu>

University of Utah
Management 350 "Principles of Managment" Steve Maranville
Fall Quarter, 1994

MANAGEMENT 350 COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of modern management processes: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. For the first half of the course, students participate in an experiential exercise--Work Lab--through which the classroom becomes an organization that contracts with a public/nonprofit agency to produce/perform a product/service. For the second half of the course, students convene in a more traditional classroom setting in which students are introduced to extant theories of management, while also being encouraged to create their own theories from reflection on the preceding Work Lab experience.

CRITERIA FOR DESIGNATION OF SERVICE-LEARNING COURSE:

(1) NEEDED SERVICE: Students provide a needed service to public/nonprofit agencies by forming a "classroom organization" that contracts to produce/perform a specified product/service.

(2) SERVICE-SUBJECT MATTER RELATION: Through the process of producing/performing the contracted-for product/service, students gain first-hand exposure to the four functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling.

(3) CLASS CONTEMPLATES LEARNING THROUGH SERVICE: Throughout the course, class sessions are set aside as "Workshops" for reflecting on the service experience as well as the classroom organization experience.

(4) CREDIT/ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING FROM SERVICE: Students are evaluated on five activities. A) The classroom organization produces/performs a product/service which is evaluated jointly by the client organization and the instructor. B) The classroom organization is required to create a policy manual that describes the process by which the organization operated while producing/performing the product/service. Since these first two activities consist of one output for the classroom organization, the two activities are graded on a collective basis with each member of the classroom organization receiving the same grade. C) Each student submits an individual debriefing of her/his experience with the classroom organization. To facilitate this debriefing, students are encouraged to maintain a learnng log joumal) of events, decisions, actions, and feelings. D) Students are further evaluated through the administration of scheduled tests that survey students' mastery of the principles of management. E) Finally, the level of students' learning is evaluated through a final essay exam that asks students to combine theory and experience to improve the operations of the classroom organization.

(5) SERVICE RECIPIENTS EVALUATE SERVICE: The completed output of the contracted-for product/service will be evaluated by representatives of the client organization according to the mutually agreed upon project specifications.

(6) SERVICE DEVELOPS CIVIC EDUCATION: To provide the contracted-for product/service, students must learn about the client organization's mission as well as the populations served by that client organization.

(7) KNOWLEDGE ENHANCES SERVICE: Students acquire both functional knowledge of management principles and civic knowledge of disadvantaged populations within the community. The course is intended to raise the consciousness of students in applying their managerial knowledge to social problems.

(8) LEARNING FROM OTHER CLASS MEMBERS: The highly interactive setting of the classroom organization provides substantive and frequent opportunities for leaming from collaborative experience.

Purpose of the Course

This course is dedicated to the study of the principles of These principles are fundamentally related to four management functions: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Therefore, this course will expose students to an environment requiring the acquisition and application of traditional and contemporary managerial concepts, skills, and values. To accomplish this purpose, the course approaches the subject in two ways: experientially and traditionally. For the first half of the course, students will participate in an experiential exercise--Work Lab--through which the classroom becomes an organization. Class members will become associates in the Work Lab organization that produces a product/service for a public/nonprofit community agency. During this experience, students will be challenged to acquire the needed knowledge, skills, and values for successful management of this classroom organization. Regularly scheduled class sessions will become workshops for addressing these challenges, and the course text will be utilized as a reference. For the second half of the course, students will convene in a more traditional classroom setting in which the text will be used as the primary basis for lecture and discussion. During this part of the course, students will be introduced to extant theories of management, while also being encouraged to produce their own theories from reflection on the preceding Work Lab experience.

Course Objectives

This course is intended to facilitate the following learning objectives:

To introduce students to the existing concepts and theories that constitute the principles of management;

To acquaint students with the four managerial functions: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling;

To advance students' abilities at performing the role of a manager;

To initiate a program of life-long learning about management and organizational studies.

Course Activities

To accomplish the preceding learning objectives, students will be evaluated on the following course activities

Work Lab Product (20% of course grade) The completed product of the Work Lab experience will be evaluated jointly by the client organization and the course instructor, according to the criteria of the agreed upon product standards. The question will be asked, "To what extent does the product meet the contracted specifications?" The completed product will be presented to the client organization at an agreed upon time during the sixth week of the course.

Work Lab Policy Manual (20%. of course grade) In the process of producing the Work Lab product, the classroom organization will prepare a policy manual that describes how the organization operates. Policy manuals might contain--but certainly is not limited to materials such as mission statements, organizational objectives, organizational charts, reporting procedures, codes of conduct, operational plans and procedures, etc. The classroom organization will submit one policy manual for the organization. This policy manual will be evaluated by the instructor on the basis of how well it serves as a "user's guide." The question will be asked, "To what extent does the policy manual offer a comprehensive disclosure of the organizing process?" The manual must be delivered to the instructor's campus mailbox on or before Friday, October 28 at 5:00 pm.

Individual Debriefing (20% of course grade) Each student will write an individual debriefing of the Work Lab experience. This activity asks the student to articulate what s/he learned from the Work Lab experience that is relevant to the study of organizations and management. To complete this activity, the student might consider keeping a learning log (journal) of events, decisions, actions, and feelings throughout the Work Lab experience. The question will be asked, "To what extent does this debriefing reflect meaningful insights about the principles of management?" The debriefing should be a maximum of five double-spaced, type-written pages with reasonable margins. The individual debriefing is due at the beginning of the sixth class period.

Tests (20% of course grade) During class periods six, seven, eight, and ten, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of management learning in the form of a test. These tests will cover material from the readings for and discussions of that class period. Tests will primarily consist of objective questions. Make-up tests can be arranged at a reduced grade.

Final Exam (20% of course grade) The course will conclude during class period eleven with a final exam. This exam will be of a comprehensive essay format, and will require a synthesis of course experiences, readings and discussions.