University of Utah
Psychology 325:
Child Abnormal Psychology (Developmental Psychopathology)
Paul Florsheim, Ph.D.
First taught, Spring 1996

This class provides an introduction to the etiology, development, and diagnosis of child and adolescent psychopathology. Lectures, discussions, readings, and assignments focus on various theoretical perspectives on child and adolescent psychopathology. Individual, interpersonal, contextual, and cultural factors contributing to the development of psychopathology are addressed. Several specific child and adolescent psychological disorders will be highlighted and discussed.

Students in this course will have the option of participating in a "service learning track." Service learning students will be placed at one of three facilities for treating emotionally disturbed children. Students will spend at least three hours each week participating in the milieu treatment of these children, working under the supervision of a volunteer coordinator. Bimonthly discussion groups will help students process and learn from their experiences. Required papers will focus on integrating practical (service learning) experiences and assigned readings.

(1) Students will provide a needed service. The service component of this course is designed to assist not-for-profit therapeutic schools and program in the treatment of emotionally and behaviorally disturbed children. These programs depend on volunteers to help them supervise and provide positive experiences for troubled children. service leaning students will be engaged in the milieu treatment of children, providing them with attention, care, support, understanding, and supervision.

(2) Service is content related. The activities of the service learning students will be directly relevant to the topic of the course (abnormal child psychology). Service Learning will provide students with the opportunity to observe some of the emotional and behavioral problems discussed in class. The opportunity to work closely with "troubled" children will help to "humanize" the topic of child psychology.

(3) Class provides students with structured opportunities for learning through service. Students will be required to attend bimonthly discussion groups to process their experiences as volunteers. They will also be required to write a paper integrating their practical experiences with the knowledge/understanding acquired through readings, lectures, and class discussions.

(4) Learning derived from service will be assessed. Students will be asked to write a paper focusing on how the experience has contributed to their personal and intellectual development. Specifically, they will be asked to integrate their "book" knowledge and "practical knowledge. This paper will be graded and will count toward their final grade. Also, volunteer coordinators will be asked to evaluate each students functioning as a volunteer.

(5) The volunteer supervisors will provide feedback regarding student's functioning and contribution to the program.. Each of the agencies in which service learning students will be placed have volunteer coordinators who will be supervising student activities and will provide feedback to the instructor and teaching assistant throughout the quarter.

(6) Service is oriented to facilitate the development of good citizens as well as good students. Representatives of the agencies for which the students will volunteer will come to the class and lead reflection sessions on the importance of individuals being involved with their communities.

(7) Knowledge from course work will enhance service. The issues covered in the classroom will help students understand the various factors (developmental, contextual, physiological, interpersonal, etc.) Influencing the psychological functioning of the children at these agencies. Such an understanding will help the student to become a more sensitive and effective service provider.

(8) Classmates will learn from one another. As part of the bimonthly discussion groups, students will be encouraged to share their experiences with their peers and to discuss the relevance of these experiences to the issues discussed int the more formal learning aspects of the class.

This class provides an introduction to the etiology, development, and diagnosis of child and adolescent psychopathology. Lectures, discussions, readings, and assignments focus on various theoretical perspectives on child and adolescent psychopathology* Individual, interpersonal, contextual, and cultural factors contributing to the development of psychopathology are addressed. Several specific child and adolescent psychological disorders will be highlighted and discussed.

Students in this course will have the option of participating in a "service learning track." Service learning students will be placed at one of three facilities for treating emotionally disturbed children (see below). Students will spend at least three hours each week participating in the milieu treatment of these children, working under the supervision of a volunteer coordinator. Bimonthly discussion groups will help students process and learn from their experiences. Required papers will focus on integrating practical experiences and assigned readings.

Required Readings

Text Book :

         Wenar, C. (1994) Developmental Psychopathology: From Infancy
         Through Adolescence Third Edition.  New York: McGraw-Hill

Other Required Readings (on reserve at Marriot Library)

Bowlby, J. A Secure Base. New York: Basic Books. Cicchetti, D., Toth, S., Bush, M., Gillespie, J. (1988) Stage salient issues: A transactional model of intervention. In E. Nannis and P. Cowan (Eds.) Developmental Psychopathology and its Treatment. New Directions in Child Development, 39. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Social and Behavioral Sciences Series.

Cowan, P (1988) Developmental Psychopathology: A nine-cell map of the territory. In E. Nannis and P. Cowan (Eds.) Developmental Psychopathology and its Treatment New Directions in Child Development, 39, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Social and Behavioral Sciences Series.

Erikson, E. (1983) The Problem of Ego Identity. In A.Esman.(Ed). Psychiatric Treatment of Adolescents N.Y. International universities Press.

Mahler, Margaret and McDevitt, J. (1980). The SeparationIndividuation Process and Identity Formation. In S Greenspan and G.Pollack (Eds.) The Course of Life: Psychoanalytic Contributions Toward Understanding Personality Development

Minuchin, S. (1974) Families and Family Therapy Harvard Press. Chapter 3.

Ogbu, J. (1981 ) Origins of human competence: A cultural ecological perspective. Child Development, 52 413-429

Weiner, I. (1992) Psychological Disturbance in Adolescence. Second Edition. Wiley. Chapter 5.

Other Suggested Readings

Rapoport,, J.(1989) The Boy Who Couldn't stop washing New York:Signet.

Shepard, Elizabeth (1994) H.

Date: Wed, 31 Jan 1996 14:45:06 MST
From: Renee Buchanan <RBUCHAN@ssb1.saff.utah.edu