University of Utah
Political Science 630
Administrative Theory
5 quarter credits.

Laurie DiPadova
OFFICE AND PHONE: OSH 212J, 84112; 801-585-7985 E-MAIL: dipadova@poliserve.poli-sci.utah.edu

  1. Students would provide a direct service to disadvantaged individuals through a community agency. Arrangements have been made for students to work with LifeCare Services at the Salt Lake Area Community Services Council and with the Computer Club Project, sponsored by the R. Harold Burton Foundation. In addition, students may suggest other organizations they may wish to work with, and clear this with me in advance. Students understand that this is direct nonpaid service to individuals--not to agencies or organizations.
  2. The service relates to the subject matter of the course in that many MPA students will find themselves working in public agencies, or in nonprofit organizations giving valuable public service, during their career. These agencies are created for the public good, but many times public managers have had no direct experience with the disadvantaged and underprivileged of our society. Such direct experience with individuals in need can only enhance one's public management experience, and enrich one's judgment while performing in responsible positions of public trust.
  3. Students will meet with me frequently to discuss their experiences. in this way any possible difficulties students may have may be addressed. They will also make an oral presentation (perhaps as a panel) to the class regarding their experience.
  4. Students will keep a confidential journal which is not evaluated, but which will be read in order to MONITOR their progress. Students will submit, by the end of the term, a 6-8 page paper regarding their experience and its relation to the field of public administration. This paper is graded, while to journal is not. They will also make an oral presentation (perhaps as a panel) to the class regarding their experience. If there is more than one student choosing the service learning option, I will try to organize them into a group. Students may choose this service learning option in lieu of one of their essay assignments.
  5. Every two weeks I will be in contact with the individuals in the organizations who supervise the students, who will give me feedback, and who will be giving students feedback and evaluation of their service.
  6. 1 feel that the meeting of this criteria is evident from what has already been proposed above, and in the syllabus. In addition, I want the students to see individuals in "the underclass" of our society as multidimensional human beings, and not as categories or labels. As stated in the syllabus:

This is considered an important option because many MPA students find themselves working in public agencies during their career. These agencies are created for the public good, but many times public managers have had no direct experience with the disadvantaged and underprivileged of our society. Such direct experience with individuals in need can only enhance one's public management experience, and enrich one's judgment while performing in responsible positions of public trust.

7. Knowledge from the course will help students in their service experience. This course addresses, among other things, the inherent dilemma between the dynamics of public organizations and the needs of individuals. In the administrative theory course we deal with critical issues of the role of government in the lives of individuals. One mark of an effective democracy is the ability and the willingness to represent the interests and well-being of marginalized and voiceless individuals of our society. This is a hallmark of true public service--to act in the interest of others.

8. The in-class discussions will enable others class members to gain from the experiences of those who do the service-learning option, as well as enable all students engaged in service learning to share with each other.

General Approach: Political Science 630 establishes the theory base for the field of public administration. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a diverse but comprehensive set of historical and current theories, concepts, and approaches in public administration, and relating these theories to the practical and ethical concerns of administrators. Attention is given in this course to the original works in public administration, and the historical development of theory in the field. Students will be expected to make reasoned judgments about the value of various scholars' contributions.

The course emphasizes concepts, issues, conflicts, and dilemmas that are central to organization theory in general and public administrative theory in particular. Heavy emphasis is placed on the issues and debates of the field.

Political Science 630 is in the process of being considered as a service learning course at the University, as designated by the Lowell L. Bennion Community Service Center. Students have the opportunity and the option of engaging in community service as part of their course requirements. This is considered an important option because many WA students find themselves working in public agencies during their career. These agencies are created for the public good, but many times public managers have had no direct experience with the disadvantaged and underprivileged of our society. Such direct experience with individuals in need can only enhance one's public management experience, and enrich one's judgment while performing in responsible positions of public trust. Participation in this is entirely optional.

TEXTS:

Bennion, Lowell L. Max Weber's Methodology. Paris: Les Presses Modernes. 1933.

Denhart, Robert B. Theories of Public Organization. Behnont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. 1993.

Shafritz, Jay M. and Albert. C. Hyde. Classics of Public Administration. 3rd edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. 1991.

SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS.- Choose ONE of the following sets of books:

  1. Bureaucracy Set:

Ferguson, Kathy E. The Feminist Case Against Bureaucracy. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. 1984.

Goodsell, Charles T. The Case for Bureaucracy: A Public Administration Polemic. 3rd edition. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House Publishers, Inc. 1994.

H. Individual Values and Public Policy Set:

Fritschler, A. Lee and James M. Hoefler. Smoking and Politics: Policy Making and the Federal Bureaucracy. 5th edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall. 1995.

Scott, William G. and David K Hart. Organizational Values in America. New Brunswick, , NJ: Transaction Publishers. 1991.

III. Leadership Set:

Gardner, John W. On Leadership. New York: The Free Press. 1990.

Wheatley, Margaret J. Leadership and the New Science. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers. 1992.

FORMAT.- Lectures, discussions, and individual and group exercises and presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Evaluation in this course will be based on the quality of the papers and other written assignments, as well as on the quality of in-class participation. Evaluation of written work includes attention to basic grammar, spelling, and the University's standard of academic integrity.

  1. THEORY ESSAYS: Each student will submit four theory essays during the term These essays examine in some depth the contributions of various theorists to public administration. These essays are NOT term papers. They are thought-pieces, informed by the reading. Essays should be word processed, double-spaced, and SUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE. Careful attention should be given to spelling and grammar.
  2. EXAMINATION: A final examination will be held.
  3. PARTICIPATION: Students are expected to participate in all class discussions and group activities.

SERVICE-LEARNING OPTION: Students engaged in the service learning option will be exempted from one of the theory essays and required to do the following:

  1. Engage in direct community service for 4 hours per week during the quarter. You may make these arrangements with Kristi Johnson, Director of LifeCare Services (for the elderly) at the Salt Lake Area Community Services Council (phone 978-2452). If you would like to participate with another organization, please clear this in advance. If you choose this option, please indicate this in writing by class time [date]....
  2. Keep a regular journal of one's experiences and impressions. This journal is separate from the course journal.
  3. Write a 6-8 page paper about the nature of your service, what you learned from the experience, and implications for public administration as you see it.
  4. Give a brief presentation in class about your experience.

EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE: Course grades will be computed as follows: Theory essays: 15% each Class Participation: 15% Final Examination: 2 5 %

I sincerely trust and expect that academic dishonesty will not be an issue in this course. Unfortunately it has become a very serious problem on many campuses, and it is not limited to undergraduate students. The purpose of the following statement is to prevent any misunderstandings about what constitutes academic dishonesty and what will be done if such actions are encountered.

Academic honesty is expected. An act of academic dishonesty will result in a course grade of E and a recommendation of additional disciplinary action.

Following are definitions of four common forms of academic dishonesty. Any of these actions will be considered violations and treated as such. These standards are in addition to the University wide guidelines concerning academic honesty which may be in effect.

  1. Cheating. The giving or receiving of any unauthorized assistance on any academic work.
  2. Plagiarism. Presenting the language, structure, or ideas of another person or persons as one's own original work.
  3. Falsification. Any untrue statement, either oral or written, concerning one's own academic work or the academic work of another student, or the unauthorized alteration of any academic record.
  4. Previously submitted work. Unless specifically authorized by the instructor, all academic work undertaken in a course must be original; i.e., it must not have been submitted in a prior course or be submitted in a course being taken concurrently.

READING AND ASSIGNMENT SCHEDULE:

         Week of-
         October 3  Denhart, chapter 1; Shafritz and Hyde, Part I
         October 10 Denhart, chapter 2; Shafritz and Hyde, Part 11
         October 17 Bennion (entire)

THEORY ESSAY #1 DUE October 17: Choose two theorists from the Denhart, Bennion, and the Shafritz and Hyde readings assigned thus far, and discuss, in 4-6 pages, which of their contributions you consider to be the most valuable for public administration today, and/or have current applicability to today's public organizations and why.

October 24           Shafritz and Hyde, Part El
October 31           Denhart, chapters 3 and 4

THEORY ESSAY #2 DUE October 31: Choose two theorists from Shafritz and Hyde, Part HI, and from Bennion, and discuss, in 4-6 pages, which of their contributions you consider to be the most valuable for public administration today, and/or have current applicability to today's public organizations, and why.

November 7
Shafritz and Hyde, Part IV

November 14
In Shafritz and Hyde, Part V: all EXCEPT Mosher & others article; Denhart, chapter 5

THEORY ESSAY #3 DUE November 14: Choose two theorists from the Denhart, chapters 3 and 4, and from Shafritz and Hyde, Part IV and discuss, in 4-6 pages, which of their contributions you consider to be the most valuable for public administration today, and/or have current applicability to today's public organizations, and why

November 21
In Shafritz and Hyde, Part VI: all EXCEPT Mosher, and Moe

November 28
Denhart, chapters 6 and 7

THEORY ESSAY #4 DUE November 28: Looking at the set of books which you have read, how are they relevant to public administration? In what ways do the two books disagree? What are the most valuable contributions of these books to public administration today, and why? Please limit your response to 4-6 pages.

December 5
Denhart, chapter 8

FINAL EXAM-- Thursday, December 14th, 5:30-7:30 PM.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (Public Law 101-336), I wish to offer any qualified student, with a disability, the opportunity to meet with me privately to discuss receiving reasonable accommodations. Such accommodations will be afforded based on the specific disability and as agreed in writing. This statement in no way asks that students identify themselves as having disabilities; however, a request for reasonable accommodation I can be granted only when a student makes her or his disability known.

                                        Date: Tue, 19 Nov 1996 16:14:12 MST
                                        From: Renee Buchanan [RBUCHAN@ssb2.saff.utah.edu]