Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) 4500
Section 001
Instructor: Robin Crews
Spring, 1996
Ekeley Science Bldg. E1B75
Tues./Thurs. 3:30-4:45pm

Senior Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies* **
Theme: "From Prejudice to Justice"

Purpose and Objectives of the Course

This course offers students the opportunity to examine specific theoretical perspectives in Peace and Conflict Studies and conduct in-depth research projects using a case-study approach. This semester the course theme is "From Prejudice to Justice."

Given the increased visibility of prejudice, intolerance, so-called "hate groups" and "hate speech" (in this country and around the world) - and the increased visibility of violence associated with these phenomena - it is appropriate and timely for seniors in Peace and Conflict Studies to: (1) examine the origins of prejudice and related violence, and (2) develop strategies for moving society and the world at large beyond these destructive forces that work against peace. Thus, students in this class seek to understand prejudice and its ramifications and then explore relevant pathways to justice. Given that the Senior Seminar is a critical thinking course, there is significant emphasis on using critical thinking skills in writing and class discussion.

Students engage in substantive research on a specific project within the interdisciplinary field of Peace and Conflict Studies using a case-study approach. Projects are conducted from one or more discipline-oriented perspectives. The course requires students to develop and strengthen their critical thinking skills through readings, oral discussion, and writing assignments throughout the semester that lend themselves to development and evaluation of argumentation. Peace and Conflict Studies is a field that pedagogically integrates academic inquiry with real-world issues, problems, demands and experiences. Thus, this course provides certificate and non-certificate seniors alike with the opportunity to: (a) think about the world and the subject matter in interdisciplinary ways, and (b) challenge themselves to integrate their "real world" concerns with more traditional classroom learning. In doing so, the course helps students develop relationships with a variety of communities (from immediate to global), and prepares students for post-graduate and post-university environments.

The first part of the course focuses on: (1) development of critical thinking skills and evaluation of argumentation; (2) exploring case-studies presented in the readings; (3) beginning an examination of prejudice; (4) selecting and proposing a research project to be completed during the semester; and (5) critiques of common readings relevant to the case-study. The second part of the course is devoted to: (1) further examination of critical thinking skills; (2) continuing the analysis of prejudice and related violence; (3) an oral and written evaluation of each research proposal by the class; and (4) assigned readings relevant to each case-study, in consultation with the instructor. The final part of the course includes: (1) an examination of justice and peace-development strategies; (2) writing the research paper; (3) class discussions of common problems in conducting the research; (4) students reading and critiquing each other's papers; and (5) students' final presentations and evaluations of one another's projects.

*Required for PACS Certificate **Satisfies Critical Thinking Requirement, Core Curriculum

Course Requirements/Grades

1. Active Participation in Class Discussions on Readings              -  30%
2. Paper Prospectus                               		      - (Given)
3. Research Paper (Case-Study; representing a semester's work)        -  30%
  (Due at the beginning of the Final Exam Period)
4. Ten Weekly (Written) Reflections on critical thinking, and class   -  20%
   content and process
5. Oral Presentation of the Case-Study - 5% 6. Written and oral evaluations of other students' work - 15% (including each prospectus and case-study
Total - 100%

Important Dates to Remember
Mar 25-29 Spring Break
May 2 Last class (for this course)
May 7-8 Reading Days
May 9-15 Exam Week
May 10 Exam Period for this class (7:30-10:30pm)

Office Hours: Tues./Thurs.: 1-3 pm and by appointment.
Office Location: Institute of Behavioral Science (IBS) Building #5, Suite #11. (This building is located next door to the Armory, which is on the north edge of campus on University Ave.).
Office Phone Number: 492-7718.
EMail Address: crews@csf.colorado.edu

Required Books to Buy
James A. Aho, This Thing of Darkness: A Sociology of the Enemy. Seattle and London: University of Washington Press. 1994. ISBN: 0-295-97355-2.
Elise Boulding, Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent World. NY: Teachers College Press, Columbia University. 1988. ISBN: 0-8077-2867-5.
Daniela Gioseffi (Ed.), On Prejudice: A Global Perspective. New York: Doubleday (Anchor). 1993. (Paperback). ISBN: 0-385-46938-1.

Optional Books to Buy
Robert L. Holmes, Nonviolence in Theory and Practice. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 1990. ISBN: 0-534-12180-2.
Anatol Rapoport, The Origins of Violence. New York: Paragon House. 1989. ISBN: 0-943852-47-1.
Gene Sharp, The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Part I: Power and Struggle. Boston, MA: Porter Sargent (Extending Horizon Books). 1973. (Paperback). ISBN: 0-87558-070-X.
Leslie Stevenson, Seven Theories of Human Nature. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1987. ISBN: 0-19-505291-9.


Weekly Schedule and Readings

Part I: Jan. 16 - Feb. 15 (Five Weeks)

  (1) Develop critical thinking skills and evaluation of argumentation
       Topics covered:  Independent and dependent variables; causal vs. spurious relationships;
     descriptive findings vs. inference; deduction, induction, and generalization; assumptions,
     propositions and conclusions (i.e., identifying each in an argument and examining the extent to
     which these elements are logically related or not); evaluation of argumentation.  Topics are
     covered through oral discussion, short writing assignments that critique readings, and short
     writing assignments intended to strengthen argumentation and evaluation of argumentation skills. 
     Students will evaluate each other's writings as well.

(2) Explore case-studies presented in the readings (3) Begin the examination of prejudice.

     Selected Readings in:  
     Daniela Gioseffi (Ed.), On Prejudice: A Global Perspective (Parts I-II) and
     James A. Aho, This Thing of Darkness:  A Sociology of the Enemy (Part I)

(4) Select and propose a research project to be completed during the semester (5) Critique common readings relevant to the case-study.

Part II: Feb. 20 - Mar. 21 (Five Weeks)

  (1) Further examination of critical thinking skills
     Topics covered:  Ideology and perception; identifying the ideological underpinnings of authors in
     their writings; and, reading critically for facts and values.
  (2) Continue the analysis of prejudice and related violence.  
     Selected Readings in:
     Daniela Gioseffi (Ed.), On Prejudice: A Global Perspective (Parts I-II) and
     James A. Aho, This Thing of Darkness:  A Sociology of the Enemy (Part II) and 
     relevant peace studies literatures and media reports selected by students.

(3) An oral and written evaluation of each research proposal by the class (4) Assigned readings relevant to each case-study, in consultation with the instructor.

March 25-29: (SPRING BREAK)

Part III: Apr. 2 - May 2 (Five Weeks)

  (1) Examine justice and peace-development strategies.  
     Selected Readings in:  
     Daniela Gioseffi (Ed.), On Prejudice: A Global Perspective (Parts III)
     James A. Aho, This Thing of Darkness:  A Sociology of the Enemy (Part II) and 
     Elise Boulding, Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent 
     World.  

(2) Write the research paper
(3) Class discussions of common problems in conducting the research (4) Students read and critique each other's papers (5) Final Presentations and evaluations of one another's projects.

May 2: Last Class: Research Papers Due. Conclusions. Class Evaluation.

May 10: FINAL EXAM PERIOD (7:30 - 10:30pm)


Addendum:

Readings - and Discussion Facilitators - for Part I:

Feb.1   Women and Prejudice:            Heidi, Helen, Veronika and Jens
       Readings:    Marilyn French (115)
               Stephen Jay Gould (118), 
               Barbara Ehrenreich & Deirdre English (125)
               Sigmund Freud (288)
               Sojourner Truth (339)

Feb. 6 Rainforests/South vs. North: Molly, Julia, Christy

       Readings:    Alan Weisman & Sandy Tolan (221)
               Pablo Neruda (225)
               Susanna Hecht & Alexander Cockburn (312)

Feb. 8 Homophobia/Handicapped: Carrie and Liz

       Readings:    Chris Gillespie (227)
               Phillip Brian Harper (273)

Feb. 13   Racism & Africa:              Jill and Nathan
       Readings:    W.E.B.Du Bois (26)
               Malcolm X (199)
               Clarence Lusane (215)

Feb. 15   Ruby Ridge:              Briggs and Nicole
       Readings:    James Aho (Chapter 4)

PACS 4500
Spring 1996
Readings in Prejudice - Part II
(* = received 2 votes; ** = received 3 votes)

  Author  Title                              Pages  		Facilitators

Feb. 20
Aho Chap. 6 Who Shall Be The Enemy?

Feb.22

  Bosmajian    "From the Language of Oppression"       (356-71)
  Baldwin "If Black English Ain't a Language,          (372-75)
       Then Tell Me What Is?"
  Bischof "African Language Writing"              (379-381)

Feb. 27                                                Julia,  Veronika,  Liz
  Burger  "From The Gaia Atlas of First Peoples:       (376-77)
       'Cultural Collapse'"
  Biscusi "From 'Breaking the Silence:            (381-85)
       Strategic Imperatives for Preserving Culture'"
  Wright       "English Revisited"                (388-93)*
  Baraka  "Brought up on Right-Wing Anthologies"  (427-29)
  Mukherjee    "The Wife's Story"                 (484-97)*

Feb. 29                                                Helen,  Nathan
  Parenti "From Make-Believe Media:               (394-99)*
       'Make-Believe History'"     
  Hamilton     "Reporting 'Terrorism': The Experience  (404-08)*
  -Tweedale    of Northern Ireland"
  Lipstadt     "Beyond Belief:  The Press & the Holocaust'  (412-15)

  Lee   "Invisible Victims"                  (415-18)*
  & Channon
  Palacios     "The Colonisation of Our Pacific Islands"    (399-401)

Mar. 5 Paper Proposals Due - Presentations and Q/A

Mar. 7 " " " " " "

Mar. 12                                                Carrie,  Jill
  Mura  "Strangers in the Village"           (434-50)
  Jen   "What Means Switch"             (451-68)*
  Spencer "Critical Thinking:  Racism & Education      (471-78)**
       in the U.S. 'Third World'"
  Sacco   "Immigrant Education: From the Transcripts   (480-82)*
       of the Sacco and Vanzetti Trial

Mar. 14                                                Heidi,  Jens
  Aho (Chap. 5)     "A Library of Infamy               (68-82)

Mar. 19
ML King, Jr. "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" (On Reserve for SOCY 2025 - Section 800)

Mar. 21 Attend Holocaust Week Panel (1-4pm)

Not included in Part II of the course (Perhaps Part III?):

  Aho (Chap. 3)     "Reification and Sacrifice:        (35-49)
           The Goldmark Case
  Aho (Chap. 8)          "Out of Hate: A Sociology          (122-38)
         of Defection from Neo-Nazism"
  Aho (Chap.11)     "Apocalypse and the Hero"          (176-84)

Lakey (excerpt from) Powerful Peacemaking


PART III: READINGS and WEEKLY SCHEDULE

April 2 ML King, Jr., "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" (On Reserve for SOCY 2025 - Section 800)

April 4: Elise Boulding: Chapter 4: "Conflict, Diversity, and Species Identity"

April 9:            M.L. King, Jr.:  "From 'On Loving Your Enemies" and "Declarations of Independence'"
        (Gioseffi - p. 575-82)  
        Elise Boulding:  Chapter 5:  "Growing Up in a High-Technology culture:  Problems of 
        Knowing."

April 11:

April 16:

April 18: Free Day for Finishing Papers. Copies of papers for April 22 made available to everyone.

April 23: Discussions and critiques of 3 papers (copies of papers provided during the previous class).

Briggs, Carrie, Nathan

April 25: Discussions and critiques of 4 papers (copies of papers provided during the previous class).

Christy, Helen, Jens, Jill

April 30: Discussions and critiques of 4 papers (copies of papers provided during the previous class).

Heidi, Julia, Liz, Molly

May 2: Discussions and critiques of 2 papers (copies of papers provided during the previous class).

        All Research Papers Due.  Conclusions. Class Evaluation.
        Nicole, Veronika

May 10:        Papers Due no later than today at 5pm.  Must be handed to me personally.  Do not put in
        any "box" anywhere.  You may turn them in earlier if you life (preferred).

Readings to find dates for:

Aho: Chapter 10 (Helen)

Boulding:      Chapter 6 (Veronika)
       Chapter 7    (            )
       Chapter 8    (Julia)
Gioseffi:
   Amiri Baraka, "Nationalism is always Oppressive"  (p.559-61)           (          )
   Ashley Montagu, "From Man's Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race"  (p.591-99)   (          )

Reminder:

(Purpose and Objectives of the Course)
... The final part of the course includes: (1) an examination of justice and peace-development strategies; (2) writing the research paper; (3) class discussions of common problems in conducting the research; (4) students reading and critiquing each other's papers; and (5) students' final presentations and evaluations of one another's projects...

(Weekly Schedule and Readings)
...Part III: Apr. 2 - May 2 (Five Weeks) (1) Examine justice and peace-development strategies.

     Selected Readings in:  
     Daniela Gioseffi (Ed.), On Prejudice: A Global Perspective (Parts III)
     James A. Aho, This Thing of Darkness:  A Sociology of the Enemy (Part II) and 
     Elise Boulding, Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent 
     World.  

(2) Write the research paper
(3) Class discussions of common problems in conducting the research (4) Students read and critique each other's papers (5) Final Presentations and evaluations of one another's projects....