University of Colorado at Boulder
Sociology 2025 - Section 880
Instructor: Robin Crews
Spring, 1996
Tues./Thurs. 11:00-12:30pm

Kittredge Honors Seminar:
Nonviolence and the Ethics of Social Action

Purpose and Objectives of the Course

This course is an examination of the phenomenon of nonviolence as a critical dynamic of social action and social change. Major emphases include: the origins of nonviolence and violence, the logic of nonviolence and the illogic of violence, theories and methods of nonviolence throughout history, contemporary applications of nonviolence, nonviolent conflict resolution, and the ethics of action intended to produce social change. Although the dominant perspective in the course is sociological, it is approached overall from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Course objectives include familiarity with: the sociological phenomenon of nonviolence; theories of conflict, social change, power, and nonviolence; religious nonviolence and pacifism; secular nonviolence; the nonviolence of Henry David Thoreau, C. Mohandas K. Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr.; an historical overview of nonviolent conflicts; several case studies in nonviolence, including: Gandhian nonviolence in India, nonviolence in the United States - e.g., the civil rights and peace movements - nonviolent social change and transformation in Europe in the late 1980s; and prospects for nonviolent social change in the 21st century.

Service-Learning

This course is designed as a "service-learning" course. Essentially this means that you will have the opportunity to augment your "traditional" learning experience in the classroom with experiential learning in the form of some kind of community service related to nonviolence and/or the ethics of social change. Thus, you will learn about nonviolence and social change via service and experience - as well as through our readings and classroom discussions. We will discuss service-learning extensively at the beginning of the semester so that everyone knows what it means and understands how this aspect of the course will work.

You will be required to: (1) find an appropriate placement in a community agency that is directly connected with the content of the course (I will help you here, of course); (2) engage in three hours of service each week (for at least twelve of the fifteen weeks during the semester) which helps you explore nonviolence and social change in direct ways; (3) turn in five "service-learning reflections" throughout the semester on specified dates; and (4) write a final integrative paper that integrates your semester's service with the readings, class discussions, and your understanding of nonviolence. Clearly, you will need to have a great deal of self-discipline to complete this aspect of the course successfully.

If you wish, you may "opt out" of the service-learning aspects of the class. If you prefer the "traditional" track, you will be required to complete five "reading sets," write the mid-semester take-home essays, and write the final take-home essays. Please let me know by January 18th if you wish to "opt out" of the service-learning dimension of the class.

Everyone is required to complete all readings on time and participate actively in the class discussions.

Course Requirements/Grades

The Service-Learning Track:

1. Find an appropriate placement in a community agency; engage in three    - 50% of grade
   hours of service each week (for at least twelve of the fifteen weeks 
   during the semester) which helps you explore nonviolence and social 
   change in direct ways; and actively participate in "structured
   reflection" sessions about your service during classtime.
2. Turn in five "service-learning reflections" throughout the semester     - (graded in the above)
   on specified dates.
3. Using your "service-learning reflections" as a starting point, write - 20% a final integrative paper that integrates your semester's service with the readings, class discussions, and your understanding of nonviolence. 4. Complete Readings and Participate Actively in Class Discussions on - 30% Readings. (Attendance will be noted, but not "graded;" instead, it will be used as a "fudge factor" in determining grades)
Total - 100%

The "Traditional" Track:

1. Complete All Readings and 5 Reading Question Sets                       - 20% of grade 
   (Each Set has two questions: short essay format)
2. Active Participation in Class Discussions on Readings                   - 30%
  (Attendance will be noted, but not "graded;" instead, it 
   will be used as a "fudge factor" in determining grades)
3. Complete the Mid-Semester Take-Home Essays                              - 20%
4. Complete the Semester-End Take-Home Essays				   - 30%
Total - 100%

Important Dates to Remember
Mar 21 (Traditional Track:) Mid-Semester Take-Home Essay Due (in Class) Mar 25-29 Spring Break
May 2 Last class (for this course)
May 7-8 Reading Days
May 9-15 Exam Week
May 14 Exam Period for this class (7:30 -10:30 am) Final Paper or Semester-End Take-Home Essay Due (at 9 -10 am)

Office Hours: Tues./Thurs.: 1 - 3 pm and by appointment.
Office Location: Institute of Behavioral Science (IBS) Building #5, Suite #11. (This building is located next door to the Armory, which is on the north edge of campus on University Avenue).
Office Phone Number: 492-7718.
EMail Address: crews@csf.colorado.edu

Required Books to Buy
Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes.
Louis Fischer, Gandhi. His Life and Message for the World.
Robert L. Holmes, Nonviolence in Theory and Practice.
Dan Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior: A Book That Changes Lives.
Adam Roberts, "Civil Resistance in the East European and Soviet Revolutions."
Gene Sharp, The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Part I: Power and Struggle.

Optional Books to Buy
Joan V. Bondurant, Conquest of Violence: The Gandhian Philosophy of Conflict.
Thomas Merton (Ed.), Gandhi on Non-Violence.


Weekly Schedule and Readings

January
16 I. Introductions and Overview of the Course

        Introductions to Peace Studies and CU's Peace & Conflict
        Studies Certificate Program (PACS); personal introductions;
        approach to the course; pre-assessment:  what do you already
        know about nonviolence?; overview of the course. 

18 II.Peace and the Person: Conflict Resolution and Interpersonal Conflict

        Conflict Analysis, Conflict Styles, Negotiation & Mediation
          Readings:  Fisher & Ury, Getting to Yes (xi-83)
        DECISION DUE TODAY ON  SERVICE-LEARNING vs. "TRADITIONAL" TRACK
23      Conflict Resolution and Interpersonal Conflict (con't.)
        Conflict Analysis, Conflict Styles, Negotiation & Mediation
          Readings:  Fisher & Ury, Getting to Yes (84-154)

25 III.Service as one Path to Peace and Justice

        Service-learning; service placements; contracts; initial 
        reflections; looking ahead at service for the rest of the
        semester.

30 IV.Introduction to Nonviolence and Violence

  	Where does Violence Come From?
  	Where does Nonviolence Come From?
          Readings:  (Total = 26 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (11-39)
          In-Class Readings:  (Total = 2 pages)
          "The Seville Statement on Violence"

February
1 Where Does Violence Come From? (con't.)

   HAVE A SERVICE-LEARNING PLACEMENT CONTRACT SIGNED BY TODAY
          Readings:  (Total = 14 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 1:  43-57)

6 V. Theories of Social Change and Conflict

          Readings:  (Total = 19.5 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 2:  59-78)
        BEGIN SERVICE NO LATER THAN TODAY
        (READING SET #1 HANDED OUT TODAY)

8 VI. Theories of Power and the Social Roots of Political Power

          Readings:  (Total = 37 pages)
          Kenneth Boulding, Three Faces Of Power, Pp.9-13, 15-33
          Gene Sharp, The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Part I: Power
          and Struggle, Pp.7-32
        (READING SET #1 DUE TODAY)

13      Service Day
        Service and Service-Learning:  Structured Reflection
          Readings:  (Total = 18.5 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 3:  79-97)
        (SERVICE-LEARNING REFLECTION #1 DUE TODAY)

15 VII.Religious Nonviolence and Pacifism: Jainism, Taoism and Buddhism

          Readings:  (Total = 38 pages)
          Robert L. Holmes, "Preview," Pp.8-9 in Robert L. Holmes,
          Nonviolence in Theory and Practice
          I.C. Sharma, "The Ethics of Jainism" (Pp.10-14 in Holmes)
          Lao Tzu, "The Way of Lao Tzu," (Pp.14-15 in Holmes)
          Robert Aitken, "The Nature of the Precepts," Pp.3-15
          Thich Nhat Hanh, "Interbeing," Pp.83-102

20 VIII.Religious Nonviolence and Pacifism: Judaism, Christianity

          and Islam
          Readings:  (Total = 28 pages)
          David P. Barash, "Ethical and Religious Perspectives" Pp.439-43
          Reuven Kimelman, "Nonviolence in the Talmud" (Pp.20-27 in Holmes)
          The Holy Bible, "The Sermon On The Mount" (Matthew 5-7, 
          Luke 6:20-49), Pp.4-8, 20-21
          The Holy Bible, "Swords into Plowshares..." (Micah 4:1-4), Pp.466
          Robert McAfee Brown, "War as the Most Obvious Example of Violence,"
          Pp.15-26

22        Religious Nonviolence and Pacifism:  Judaism, Christianity and
          Islam (con't.)  
          Readings:  (Total = 22 pages)
          David P. Barash, "Ethical and Religious Perspectives" (con't.)
          Pp.444-52
          Lawrence S. Apsey, "How Transforming Power Has Been Used in the
          Past by Early Christians" (Pp.27-28 in Holmes)
          Robert McAfee Brown, "Christian Responsibility in Human Rights,"
          Pp.82-92

27 IX.Secular Philosophy: Henry David Thoreau and William James

          Readings:  (Total = 18.5 pages)
          Henry David Thoreau, "Civil Disobedience" (Pp.29-40 in Holmes)
          William James, "The Moral Equivalent of War" (Pp.125-131 in Holmes)
        (READING SET #2 HANDED OUT TODAY)
29      Service Day
        Service and Service-Learning:  Structured Reflection
          Readings:  (Total = 40 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 4:  101-40)
        (SERVICE-LEARNING REFLECTION #2 DUE TODAY)
        (READING SET #2 DUE TODAY)

March
5 X. Gandhi and Nonviolence

          Readings:  (Total = 55 pages)
          Louis Fischer, Gandhi. His Life and Message for the World (Pp.7-62)
          SEE FILM, "Gandhi," on your own:  times will be selected for the
          class to see it together)

7       Gandhi and Nonviolence (con't.)
          Readings:  (Total = 54 pages)
          Louis Fischer, Gandhi. His Life and Message for the World (Pp.63-117)

12      Gandhi and Nonviolence (con't.)
          Readings:  (Total = 54 pages)
          Louis Fischer, Gandhi. His Life and Message for the World (Pp.117-171)
        (READING SET #3 HANDED OUT TODAY)

14      Gandhi and Nonviolence (con't.)
          Readings:  (Total = 25 pages)
          Louis Fischer, Gandhi. His Life and Message for the World (Pp.171-189)
          Joan V. Bondurant, Conquest of Violence: The Gandhian Philosophy
          of Conflict, Pp. v-ix, xiii-xix (revised ed.), v-vii (new revised ed.),
          and 3-14.
        (READING SET #3 DUE TODAY)

19      Service Day
        Service and Service-Learning:  Structured Reflection
          Readings:  (Total = 20.5 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 5:  141-61)
        MID-SEMESTER TAKE-HOME ESSAY HANDED OUT IN CLASS 

21      Service Day
        Service and Service-Learning:  Structured Reflection
          Readings:  (Total = 15 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 6:  163-77)
        (SERVICE-LEARNING REFLECTION #3 DUE TODAY)
        (MID-SEMESTER TAKE-HOME ESSAY DUE TODAY - at beginning of class)

25-29     (SPRING BREAK)

April
2 XI.Women, Gender and Nonviolence

        Racism, Sexism and Women:  Ida B. Wells:  A Passion for Justice
          Readings:  Essay(s) (to be decided) from Ida B. Wells-Barnett,
          Selected Works.
          SEE FILM:  "Ida B. Wells:  A Passion for Justice" 

4       Women, Gender and Nonviolence (con't.) 
        Women as Peacemakers
          Readings:  (To Be Selected)
        ("DAY WITHOUT VIOLENCE")

9       Women, Gender and Nonviolence (con't.) 
          Readings:  (Total = 26.5 pages)
          Betty Reardon, "Core Concepts, Basic Assumptions, and Fundamental Values"
          (Pp.10-35 in Reardon, Sexism and the War System)
        (READING SET #4 HANDED OUT TODAY)

11      Women, Gender and Nonviolence (con't.)
          Readings:  (Total = 19 pages)
          Sarah Perrigo, "Feminism and Peace" (Pp.303-322 in Peaceful Relationships)
        (READING SET #4 DUE TODAY)

16      Service Day
        Service and Service-Learning:  Structured Reflection
          Readings:  (Total = 14 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 7:  181-94)
        (SERVICE-LEARNING REFLECTION #4 DUE TODAY)
        (READING SET #5 HANDED OUT TODAY)

18     XII. Martin Luther King, Jr., Nonviolence and The Civil Rights Movement
          Readings:  (Total = 25 pages)
          Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Chapter 8 & Epilogue:  195-210)
          Martin Luther King, Jr., "Letter From A Birmingham Jail" (Pp.68-77 in Holmes)
        (SEE FILM, "From Montgomery to Memphis: Martin Luther King Documentary" in class) 
        (READING SET #5 DUE TODAY)

23      Martin Luther King, Jr., Nonviolence and The Civil Rights Movement (con't.)
          Readings:  (Total = 17.5 pages)
          Martin Luther King, Jr., "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" (Pp.90-107 in King)

25     XIII.Histories of Nonviolence and Techniques and Methods of Nonviolent Action
          Readings:  (Total = 67 pages divided by 2)
          Robert L. Holmes, "Recent Examples of Nonviolence" (Pp. 180-206)
          Gene Sharp, The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Part I: Power and
          Struggle, Pp.75-101
          Gene Sharp, "The Techniques of Nonviolent Action" 
          Gene Sharp, "198 Methods of Nonviolent Action"
        (SERVICE-LEARNING REFLECTION #5 DUE TODAY)

30 XIV.Contemporary Nonviolent Change and Transformation in Europe

          Readings:  (Total = 38 pages)
          Adam Roberts, "Civil Resistance in the East European and Soviet
          Revolutions"

May
2 XV. Conclusions: Prospects for Nonviolent Social Change in the 21st Century

          Class Evaluations
          Readings:  (None)
        SEMESTER-END TAKE-HOME ESSAY HANDED OUT IN CLASS

May

14      FINAL EXAM PERIOD  (7:30 - 10:30 am) 
        INTEGRATIVE PAPERS DUE (9-10 am) 
        SEMESTER-END TAKE-HOME ESSAY DUE (9-10 am) 

Bibliography

Robert Aitken, "The Nature of the Precepts." Chapter 1 in The Mind of Clover. San Francisco: North Point Press. 1984.

Lawrence S. Apsey, "How Transforming Power Has Been Used in the Past by Early Christians," Pp.27-28 in Robert L. Holmes, Nonviolence in Theory and Practice. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 1990.

David P. Barash, "Ethical and Religious Perspectives" Pp.439-52 in David P. Barash, Introduction to Peace Studies. Belmont: Wadsworth. 1991.

Joan V. Bondurant, Conquest of Violence: The Gandhian Philosophy of Conflict. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 1958,1988.

Joan V. Bondurant, "Hindu Tradition and Satyagraha: The Significance of Gandhian Innovations." Chap. 4 in Bondurant (1988), op. cit.

Joan V. Bondurant, "Satyagraha in Action," Pp.56-62 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Kenneth Boulding, Three Faces Of Power. Newbury Park, CA: Sage. 1989.

Robert McAfee Brown, "Christian Responsibility in Human Rights," Pp.82-92 in Robert McAfee Brown, Making Peace in the Global Village. Philadelphia: Westminster Press. 1981.

Robert McAfee Brown, "War as the Most Obvious Example of Violence," Pp.15-26 in Robert McAfee Brown, Religion and Violence. Philadelphia: Westminster Press. 1973.

Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes. New York: Penguin. 1981.

Louis Fischer, Gandhi. His Life and Message for the World. NY: New American Library. 1954.

Mohandas K. Gandhi, "On Satyagraha," Pp.51-56 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Thich Nhat Hanh, "Interbeing." Chapter 6 in Thich Nhat Hanh, Being Peace. Berkeley, CA: Parallax Press. 1987.

Robert L. Holmes, Nonviolence in Theory and Practice. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 1990.

Robert L. Holmes, "Preview," Pp. 8-9 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Robert L. Holmes, "Recent Examples of Nonviolence," Pp. 180-206 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

The Holy Bible, "The Sermon On The Mount." Matthew 5-7, Luke 6: 20-49.

The Holy Bible, "Swords into Plowshares..." (Micah 4:1-4).

Jessie Wallace Hughan, "Pacifism and Invasion," Pp.168-177 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Doris Hunter, "On the Bhagavad-Gita," Pp.16-19 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

William James, "The Moral Equivalent of War," Pp.125-131 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Reuven Kimelman, "Nonviolence in the Talmud," Pp.20-27 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Martin Luther King,Jr., "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," from Why We Can't Wait. 1963; Pp.68-77 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Martin Luther King,Jr., "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence." Pp.90-107 in Martin Luther King,Jr., Stride Toward Freedom. San Francisco: Harper and Row. 1958,1986.

Thomas Merton (Ed.), Gandhi on Non-Violence. NY: New Directions. 1964.

Dan Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior: A Book That Changes Lives. Tiburon, CA: H.J. Kramer, Inc. 1984.

A. J. Muste, "The Individual Conscience."

A. J. Muste, "War Is the Enemy," Pp.121-124 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Liane Ellison Norman, "Peace Through Strength," Pp.164-167 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Sarah Perrigo, "Feminism and Peace," Pp.303-322 in Peaceful Relationships.

Betty A. Reardon, "Core Concepts, Basic Assumptions, and Fundamental Values," Pp.10-35 in Reardon (1985).

Betty A. Reardon, Sexism and the War System. NY: Teachers College Press, Columbia University. 1985.

Adam Roberts, "Civil Resistance in the East European and Soviet Revolutions." Cambridge, MA: The Albert Einstein Institution. Monograph Series, No.4. 1991.

"The Seville Statement on Violence." 1986.

I.C. Sharma, "The Ethics of Jainism," Pp.10-14 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Gene Sharp, The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Part I: Power and Struggle. Boston, MA: Porter Sargent. 1973.

Gene Sharp, "198 Methods of Nonviolent Action."

Gene Sharp, "The Techniques of Nonviolent Action."

Henry David Thoreau, "Civil Disobedience," (1866) Pp.29-40 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Leo Tolstoy, "The Kingdom of God is Within You." Pp.177-95 in Howard P. Kainz (Ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Peace: An Anthology of Classical and Modern Sources. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1987.

Leo Tolstoy, "Letter to Ernest Howard Crosby," Pp.45-50 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Lao Tzu, "The Way of Lao Tzu," Pp.14-15 in Holmes (1990), op. cit.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Selected Works (compiled by Trudier Harris), NY: Oxford University Press. 1991.