Date: Wed, 27 Dec 1995 14:34:11 MST
                                        From: Renee Buchanan [RBUCHAN@ssb1.saff.utah.edu]

University of Utah
Mechanical Engineering 515 "Ergonomics" Donald Bloswick
Taught every fall quarter

TEXT: Ergonomics short course notes supplemented by OSHA publications, journal articles and other relevant material. ,it Is recommended that students purchase a 3-r~ing binder so that additional Information can be added during the quarter.

WEEK WEEK BEGINS KEY TOPIC

1 28 Sep Anthropometry (HW 1 , Anthropometry, handed out)

2 5 Oct Upper Extremity Cumulative Trauma Disorders and Seated Workplace Design (HW 1 due; HW 2, UECTD, handed out)

3 12 Oct Manual Material Handling (HW 2 due; HW 3, MMH, handed out)

4 19 Oct NIOSH Work Practices Guide (HW 3 due; HW 4, WPG, handed out)

5 26 Oct Metabolic Load and Heat Stress (HW 4 due; HW 5. Metabolic, handed out) PROJECT PROPOSAL DUE

6 2 Nov Ergonomics and the Senior Population (HW 5 due)

(Focus on project from here on)

7 9 Nov Vibration and Noise, Hearing

8 16 Nov Controls and Displays, Lighting

9 23 Nov The Americans With Disabilities Act

10 30 Nov OSHA involvement in Ergonomics Project Presentations

11 7 Dec Project Presentations

Finals Week

FINAL EXAM
(covers all course material and project presentations)

The first half of the course will be an intensive introduction into basic ergonomics concepts and analytical techniques required to analyze and redesign a workplace, living environment, or other environment in which people spend a considerable amount of time.

The first half of the course will contain most of the lecture material, all quizzes, and all homework. The last half of the course will included less intensive course work. Groups of 3-5 people will focus on the field application of the tools and techniques used in the first part of the course. In addition to other group meetings and field work, each group will be required to meet with Dr. Bloswick each week to discuss the group project. This "meeting" may take place in the classroom or in the field.

It is expected that the projects for the Autumn, 1992 class will involve field studies involving the elderly population. Projects for this class might include the ergonomic analysis of nursing homes, in-home resident situations or the transportation requirements of seniors. These projects might also involve the training of personnel who work in facilities serving the senior population in work methods to reduce the potential for ergonomic disorders such as cumulative trauma disorders (carpal tunnel syndrome, etc.) or back injuries which might result from lifting patients or children. It might also be feasible to actually initiate modest ergonomic "self help" programs in some facilities. Potential project sites will be dismissed during the first haft of the course. Note that these are only proposed ideas and students may develop projects which meet these general criteria. A proposal will be due from each group during the fifth week of class which outlines the proposed project. This will be reviewed by Dr. Bloswick and returned the next week.

DRAFT POINT DISTRIBUTION:

         EXAM                                     100
         HOMEWORK (5 X 1 0)           50
         QUIZZES (5 X 4)                      20
         PROJECT REPORT                100
         PROJECT PRESENTATION    50

         TOTAL                                     320

There will be five 4-point ergonomics quizzes given during the quarter for a total of 20 points. These will be given at the beginning of the class and will cover the material assigned for that class. Each quiz will also contain four-points relating to college or professional basketball. The BB questions will not count toward the ergonomics course grade, however the student with the highest total quiz points for the quarter (20 points for the ergonomics questions plus 20 points for the BB questions for a total of 40 points max) will receive 2 tickets for a UTAH JAZZ game.

GENERAL FORMAT FOR TERM PROJECTS

Cover Page: Use normal paper. The cover should include:

Name of author(s)
Course title and number
Project Report title
Submission date
instructors name

Abstract: One or two paragraphs summarizing the project.

Table of Contents: (with page numbers for major sections)

Introduction/Background

Discuss the general background of the subject area. Include any relevant previous research or information. Introduce the project and note why it is important.

Method: (For an empirical research project.)

For an emperical research project discuss the method of experimentation. (For other projects the Method Section and Results/Discussion Section are combined into the general body of the report which can be called Results/Disaission Section.)

Results/Discussion:

Summarize the results of the experimentation or research. Include tables and figures if appropriate. If a great deal of data is collected, summarize the results and include relevant raw data in an appendix. Figures are graphic illustrations of things or data. Tables are arrays of data with headings to identify the entries.

Conclusion:

Draw out key findings contained in the previous Results/Discussion section and present the implications of those findings.

References:

include information (in any accepted format with which you feel condonable) which will facilitate retrieval by an interested reader. Reference facts which are not common knowledge or opinions of others.

Appendix:

Include secondary data such as raw data. Don't include figures and tables. They belong in the text.

Other Stuff:

Put tables and figures as close as possible to (but not preceding) where they are first mentioned in the text. When tables and figures are oriented lengthwise, the bottom should be toward the night. The axis on figures should have a zero point on the axis or notation to show otherwise.

Project Groups

"Next Action" should be discussed with Dr. Bloswick next week, Don't forget that I have additional reference material available in my office.

1 . Development of a folding/portable ramp or system to allow a person In a wheelchair to access a van. This might be the same as a portable device to allow a person In a wheelchair to access an elevated surface such as a stage. This might be hand, air or C02 powered.

Next Action: Develop performance specifications such as weight, lift distance, lift capacity, type of power, etc. and preliminary design ideas. Develop ideas of physical ability of potential user.

2 . Move from wheelchair to standing/semi-standing position. This device will also help a person with poor hand function to stand up from a wheelchair to exercise or balance.

Next Action: Develop performance specifications such as weight, lift distance of seat, lift capacity, type of power, etc. and preliminary design ideas. Develop ideas of physical ability of potential user.

3 . Develop a device to hold a book or a newspaper for an Individual with person with poor hand function (arthritis?) or other disability.

Next Action: Develop performance specifications and preliminary design ideas. Develop ideas of physical ability of potential user.

4 . Analysis of patient handling task In burn unit at UU hospital. Present recommendations and short training session to nursing staff.

Next Action: Become more familiar with UM biomechanical model. Review nurse/lifting research. I have some for you to start with. Approval to do study at UU hospital has been received.

5 . Analysis of lifting hazards In the sterilization unit at UU Hospital. Present recommendations and short training session to nursing staff.

Next Action: Become more familiar with UM biomechanical model. Review nurse/lifting research. I have some for you to start with. Approval to do study at UU hospital has been received.

6 . Stair climb assist device. I envision this as a "bar:" across the stairs at waist/chest height which can be moved or Indexed ahead of the user. The bar would be able to move ahead of foot or two and "lock" so the user can hold on to the bar while climbing or descending. The bar might attaach to the existing handrail or require that a new guide or track be attached to one or both walls.

Next Action: Develop performance specifications such as grip strength, hip and knee extension strength, push strength, potential vestibular dysfunction, etc. and preliminary design ideas. Develop ideas of physical ability of potential user.

7 . Analysis of lifting hazards for nursing personnel In local nursing home. Present recommendations and short training session to nursing staff.

Next Action: Become more familiar with UM biomechanigal model. I will review this with you next week. Review nurse/lifting research. I have some for you to start with. Preliminary approval to do study at Saint Joseph Villa has been received.

8 . Ergonomics review of VDT workstations In ME administrative offices. Present recommendations and short training session to ME staff.

Next Action: Become more familiar with seated and VDT workstation design. Attend special 1 -hour lecture by Mark Dumas.

9 . Device/system to allow a user with weak hands to Insert and remove plugs from the wall and/or connect a plug to an extension cord.