Jennifer A. Vadeboncoeur
University of Colorado at Boulder

EDUCATION 3111 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Spring 1994

Instructor: Jennifer A. Vadeboncoeur, M.A. Office: ED 434 2-4681 Home: 449-7989
Office Hours: T & TH 2:00 - 3:00 or by appointment

T 4:00 - 5:40

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed for people who are interested in becoming elementary school teachers. The focus of content will be on four areas of child development: physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development. We will study both theory and practical applications of theory. Students will become fluent at interpreting theory through fair readings and developing pedagogues which fit their personal approach to or style of teaching.

GOALS/OBJECTIVES:

During the semester, prospective elementary school teachers will develop and improve their awareness of learner characteristics, the developmental patterns of those characteristics, and the possibilities for intervention in the classroom. More specifically, we will focus on child and pre-adolescent growth and development, applications of some of the theories of educational psychology and development to elementary school curriculum, school organization, school activities, and teacher-student interactions, theories of learning and current social issues that effect children directly. In addition, recognizing that schools are not an isolated part of our society, but are instead connected to and influenced by the larger social context, we will discuss how schooling and educational theory are in some important ways determined by the society in which we live.

READING LIST:
These readings are available for copying at the Equity, Diversity, and Education Library located in ED 344. The hours of operation are as follows:

     Monday and Tuesday 9:30 - 5:00 (closed 12:00-1:00)
     Wednesday and Thursday 9:30 - 8:00 (closed 12:00-1:00)
     Closed Friday, Saturday and Sunday

Listed alphabetically:

Bear, T., Schenk, S. & Buckner,L. (1992). Supporting victims of child abuse. Educational Leadership, December/January, p. 42-47.

Canady, R.L & Hotchkiss, P.R. (1989). It's a good score! Just a bad grade. Phi Delta kappan, September, pp. 224-227.

Cummins, J. (1984). The role of primary language development in promoting educational success for language minority students. Schooling and Language Minority Students: A Theoretical Framework. CA State Dept. of Education. Sacramento: Office of Bilingual/Bicultural Education.

Deyhle, D. & LeCompte, M. (1994). Differences of culture in child development: Navajo adolescents in public middle schools. Theory into Practice, Summer, in press.

Donaldson, M. (1979). Children's Minds. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., p. ix-25.

Duckworth, E. (1987). The Having of Wonderful Ideas and Other Essays on Teaching and Learning. New York: Teachers College Press, p. xi-14.

Fausto-Sterling, A. (1981). The myth of neutrality: Race, sex, and class in science. Radical Teacher, No. 19, pp. 201-218.

Gardner, H. (1991). Introduction: The central puzzles of learning. The Unschooled Mind; How children Think and How Schools Should Teach. New York: Basic Books. pp. 1-20

Gardner, H. (1991). The search for solutions: Dead ends and promising means. The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach. New York: Basic Books. pp. 185-199.

Gardner, H. (1991). Education for understanding during the early years. The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach. New York: Basic Books. pp. 200-224.

Gould, S.J. (1981). The hereditarian theory of IQ. The Mismeasure of Man. New York: W.W. Norton, pp. 146-158.

Grose, S.K. (1990). A student's advice on connecting community service to the college curriculum. Combining Service and Learning: A Resource Book for Community and Public Service. Raleigh, NC: National Society for Internships and Experiential Education, pp. 483-492.

Hoerr, T.T. (1992). How our school applied multiple intelligences theory. Educational Leadership, October, pp. 67-68.

Howard, G.R. (1993). Whites in multicultural education. Phi Delta Kappan. Vol. 75, No.1, September, p. 8-15.

Meadows, B.J. (1993). Through the eyes of parents. Educational Leadership, October, pp. 31-34.

Paley, V.G. (1979). White Teacher. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. pp. 56-94.

Santrock, J.W. (1994). Child Development. 6th Edition. Madison, WI: Brown & Benchmark.

     Chapter 1 - Introduction
     Chapter 2 - The Science of Child Development
     Chapter 6 - Physical Development in Childhood and Puberty
     Chapter 7 - Cognitive Development and Piaget's Theory
     Chapter 8 - Learning and Information Processing

Scherer, M. (1992). On savage inequalities: A conversation with Jonathan Kozol. Educational Leadership, December, pp. 4-9.

Shepard, L.A. (1991). Will national tests improve student learning? Phi Delta Kappan, November , pp. 232-238.

Stanton, T.K. (1990). (1990). Liberal arts, experiential learning and public service: Necessary ingredients for socially responsible undergraduate education. Combining Service and Learning: A Resource Book for Community and Public Service. Raleigh, NC: National Society for I internships and Experiential Education, pp. 175-189.

Sternberg, R.J., Okagaki, L., & Jackson, A.S. (1990). Practical intelligence for success in school. Educational Leadership, September, pp. 35-39.

Vygotsky, L.S. (1978). Interaction between learning and development. Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. pp. 79-91.

Wiggins, G. (1989). Teaching to the (authentic) test. Educational Leadership, Vol. 46, No. 7, April, pp. 233-237.

Wong, Fillmore, L. (1984). When learning a second language means losing the first. No-Cost Research Group, CA.

OTHER RESOURCES:

     The Equity, Diversity, and Education Library is located in ED 
     344.
     The Education Mac lab is located in ED 334.

ASSIGNMENTS:
1. Attendance and informed discussion - 20%

Attendance is mandatory. Readings are assigned for the majority of class meetings. You will be expected to complete the assigned readings before coming to class and be prepared for in class discussion. Most of you are planning a career in teaching and will devote much of your time in the future to speaking with people in classroom or committee settings, as well as in smaller parent or student meetings. It is important for you to develop sound ideas and be able to articulate them, and be able to express yourself with and in front of other people.

Remember also that we may not agree on some issues that we discuss in class. Please be respectful of other people and listen fairly to their ideas. Communicate your ideas and feelings thoughtfully and with the understanding that others may have had different experiences that may lead them to different or alternative conclusions.

2. Exams - 30%

There will be two essay exams held in class: 2/22/94 and the final exam date. Both exams will cover the material for 1/2 of the course. Questions to think and organize your idea will be discussed prior to each test.

3. Service learning project - 30%

You will choose an individual or group project and spend at least 8 hours during the semester on that project. Projects should involve some social, civic, environmental, or educational need. Examples of projects in the past have been tutoring in after school programs, teaching English to non-English speakers, working with adults with developmental disabilities in EXPAND, conducting oral histories in a senior center, serving meals at a homeless shelter, working on Habitat for Humanity building projects. Keep a journal of your activity and write a summary and a critique of what you did.

In the community:

*     Choose a site
*     Gain Access
*     Negotiate a project with the administrator/agency director
*     Complete service learning over the semester-at least 8 hours 
      outside of class
*     Keep a journal of your experience and your feelings,        
      summarize, & critique

In the classroom:

*     Provide a written report of group/individual project-for    
      dissemination to the rest of the class
*     Provide an oral presentation of group/individual project-may 
      be multimedia and creative.  All groups should check in with 
      Jen at least two class meetings prior to their oral         
      presentation to discuss options.
*     Final report to Jen-including journals, written reports for 
      class, summary of oral presentation, an critique of group   
      process. Due Date: 4/26/94

4. Team Taught class - 20%

Each student will join up with at least one other person to team teach a class. I will pass around a syllabus for sign ups.

There are two requirements for the day you lead class:

  1. Please prepare a brief (2pages or less) outline of the main points, issues,arguments in the reading and provide enough copies for the class (me too!)
     2.) Please prepare 3-4 questions to help us focus our        
         discussion.

Remember, on this day you and your partner will be the experts. Spend extra time with the reading(s) for the day you lead class. You will be responsible for facilitating the discussion and clarifying conflicts raised in class. Contact me in advance to let me know if you have questions or concerns about an issue or argument in the reading.

MEETING SCHEDULE:

Jan. 18 1. Introduction, Student information questionnaires, review syllabus

2. Fausto-Sterling, The myth of neutrality: Race, sex, and class in science

Jan. 25 Service Learning and Context Setting

  1. Stanto, Liberal arts, experiential learning and public service...

    Grose, A student's advice on connecting community service to the college

    curriculum

  2. Santrock, Chapter 1 - Introduction
Feb. 1     Context Setting and Physical Development
           1. Santrock, Chapter 2 - The science of child
development
           2. Santrock, Chapter 6 - Physical development in

childhood and puberty

Feb. 8     Cognitive Development
           1. Santrock, Chapter 7 - Cognitive Development and
Piaget's Theory
           2. Donaldson, excerpts from Children's Minds
           3. Duckworth, excerpts from The Having of Wonderful

Ideas

Feb. 15 Cognitive Development (cont.)

  1. Vygotsky, Interaction between learning and development
  2. Santrock, Chapter 8 - Learning and information processing

Feb. 22 1. Essay Exam - #1

2. Discussion of service learning projects

Mar. 1     Languages                                            
           1. Cummins, The role of primary language development in
promoting educational
              success for...
           2. Wong Filmore, When learning a second language means

losing the first

Mar. 8     Intelligence                         
           1. Movie: The American Agenda - A New Revolution in
Learning
           2. Gould, The hereditarian theory of IQ   
              Sternberg, et. al. Practical intelligence for success

in school

Mar. 15 Intelligence and Assessment

  1. Gardner, Introduction: The central puzzles of learning

    Hoerr, How our school applied multiple intelligences theory

  2. Canady & Hotchkiss, It's a good score! Just a bad grade

    Wiggins, Teaching to the (authentic) test

Mar. 22 No class - Spring Break

Mar. 29 Social Issues

  1. Paley, excerpts from White Teacher
  2. Bear, et. al, Supporting victims of child abuse Meadows, Through the eyes of parents

April 5 No class - A.E.R.A. in New Orleans

April 12 Social Issues

  1. Deyhle & LeCompte, Differences in culture of child development Scherer, On savage inequalities
  2. Howard, Whites in multicultural education

April 19 Education for Transfer and Understanding

  1. Gardener, The search for solutions...
  2. Gardener, Education for understanding... Shepard, Will national test improve student learning

April 26 1. Service learning project oral presentations

           2. Service learning project oral presentations
           Final Service learning project report due

Final Date - Essay Exam #2

                                Date: Wed, 25 Oct 1995 15:10:58 -0600 (MDT)