Teaching

Courses Taught at Loyola University Maryland

EC 102: Microeconomic Principles
This course serves as an introduction to microeconomics, the study of the decision-making process of firms and households and their interaction in the marketplace. My goal is to teach basic concepts and calculations with the intent of helping students understand and critically analyze real-world microeconomic events. By the end of this course, students should be able to (1) understand the basic concepts of economics, e.g., scarcity, opportunity cost, marginal analysis, and comparative advantage; (2) demonstrate an understanding of supply and demand analysis; (3) demonstrate an understanding of market structure and the theory of the firm; and (4) analyze current events in the domestic and global economy using the tools of microeconomics.

EC 302: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
This is a course in microeconomic theory. It builds on topics covered in Microeconomic Principles (EC 102) and analyzes these topics in greater depth through the use of Calculus-based optimization techniques. Topics covered include (1) the motives, constraints, and behavior of consumers and producers; (2) the foundation of supply and demand analysis; (3) cost analysis; (4) pricing strategies; and (5) refinements of these foundations under different market structures and regulation environments.

EC 420: Econometrics
This course exposes students to the statistical techniques that economists use for estimating and testing economic relationships. It builds on topics covered in Business Statistics (EC 220) and analyzes these topics in greater breadth and depth. There will be significant emphasis on the use of Stata, a data analysis and statistical program commonly used in academia and the private sector. Students will learn how to use Stata to organize data, run regressions, and interpret the results. By the end of this course, students should confidently include their experience with Stata as a skill on their resume and LinkedIn profile, which will help them be more competitive on the job market.

EC 460: Business and Government
Industrial Organization is the field of economics that studies how firms behave, how markets are structured, and how they interact with each other. The government must seek to appease the opposing needs of firms, who are seeking to maximize profits, and consumers, who are seeking to maximize their utility. Often times the actions that are in the best interest of firms will negatively affect consumers, and vice versa. It is in these cases that the government should step in and regulate competition and/or the market. This course discusses issues that arise with imperfect competition and the government's role in regulating industries. A major theme of this course will be focused on looking at the issues' past, present, and future. This course will chronicle the history of antitrust and regulation in order to understand how we got to the situations faced today. From there, the focus is on where we are headed in the future.

GB 707: Managerial Economics (formerly, GB 611: Global Business Analysis)
Managerial Economics is designed to give MBA students a foundation in basic economic principles. We can use the tools of economics to help explain human behavior; indeed, a basic understanding of economic principles will shed new light on observed phenomenon in our everyday life. In addition, we can utilize the economic way of thinking to sharpen our own decisions in hopes of achieving more efficient outcomes when making choices in our business or personal lives. This course will begin by covering basic economic principles that serve as the foundation for both microeconomics and macroeconomics. We will then apply these concepts in a microeconomics framework, in which we study the interaction of consumers and firms. The course ends with an introduction to macroeconomics, which is the study of the economy as a whole.

Courses Taught at The Ohio State University

Econ 200: Principles of Microeconomics
This course serves as an introduction to microeconomics, the study of the decision-making process of firms and households and their interaction in the marketplace. My goal is to teach basic concepts and calculations with the intent of helping students understand and critically analyze real-world economic events. This course covers topics on supply and demand, market structure, international trade, and antitrust policy.

Econ 367.02: Current Economic Issues in the United States
This course will span current antitrust issues in the United States. We deal with antitrust issues everyday although we might not know it. Examples span from the likes of Microsoft (why does Internet Explorer, and not Firefox, come pre-installed on computers with Windows?) to potato chips (does it seem strange that the price of a bag of chips is stamped directly on the bag?) to the National Football League (is it good that Reebok holds the exclusive rights to produce apparel for the NFL?). A major theme of this course will be focused on looking at the issues' past, present, and future. This course will chronicle the history of antitrust issues in order to understand how we got to the situations we face today. From there, we can focus on where we are headed in the future. My goal is to ensure that you will be able to discuss and analyze current antitrust issues as economic majors and minors from a top university. This course satisfies the "Second-Level Writing Course" general education requirement for a variety of majors.

Econ 570: Government and Business
Industrial Organization is the field of economics that studies how firms behave, how markets are structured, and how they interact with each other. The government must seek to appease the opposing needs of firms, who are seeking to maximize profits, and consumers, who are seeking to maximize their utility. Often times the actions that are in the best interest of firms will negatively affect consumers, and vice versa. It is in these cases that the government should step in and regulate competition and/or the market. This course discusses issues that arise with imperfect competition and the government's role in regulating industries. A major theme of this course will be focused on looking at the issues' past, present, and future. This course will chronicle the history of antitrust and regulation in order to understand how we got to the situations faced today. From there, the focus is on where we are headed in the future.

Econ 583: Economics of Sports
There are a plethora of ways to apply economic theory to the real world. This course will use the world of sports (mainly baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and soccer) to illustrate basic economic concepts. The class will be split into three sections. The first third of the class will focus on the industrial organization of sports, in which we discuss why sports leagues exists, antitrust issues associated with sports, and competitive balance. The second third of the class focuses on the connection between sports and both public finance and labor economics. We will discuss issues like why players earn such high wages, why players organize into unions, and discrimination. Finally, we will focus on college sports and selected academic papers on baseball and golf.

Teaching Awards

Chair's Award for Distinguished Teaching in Economics, Economics Department, Loyola University Maryland, 2014-2015

Graduate Associate Teaching Award in Economics, Economics Department, The Ohio State University, 2011

L. Edwin Smart Graduate Associate Teaching Award, Economics Department, The Ohio State University, 2010

Departmental Citation for Excellence in Teaching, Economics Department, The Ohio State University, 2009

Contact Information

Department of Economics
Loyola University Maryland
4501 N Charles St
Sellinger Hall 321
Baltimore, MD 21210

Office Phone: (410)617-2460
Email: kmtan@loyola.edu